About the Project
Welcome to the Matlack/Matlick/Matlock/Medlock Y-DNA Project. Broadly, our goal is to determine which lineages

are related to each other. We hope this project will provide the clues and extra evidence needed to make

breakthroughs in extending lineages that have stumped genealogists for many decades and in connecting lineages

not previously known to be related.

 

The Administrators

Sam Medlock (swmed@juno.com)

Terry Gladfelter (carlg0139@aol.com)

Brenda Avila (Ba044@aol.com)

 

Click here to contact FTDNA to order your kit or email one of the Administrators above. Be sure and let FTDNA that

you want to join the Medlock group to get the rates posted below:

 

 

For initial tests the costs are as follows:

12-marker test $99
25-marker test $124
37-marker test $149
67-marker test $248

The costs for upgrades are listed below:

12 to 25 $49
12 to 37 $99
12 to 67 $189
25 to 37 $49
25 to 67 $148
37 to 67 $99

 

Note: Keep in mind these facts when ordering your test:

 

According to FTDNA, when testing with 25 markers and if your a 25/25 match, it indicates:

 

Your perfect 25/25 match means you share a common male ancestor with a person who shares your surname

(or variant). These two facts demonstrate your relatedness.

 

Updating this to a 37 marker test, and matching 37/37 markers it indicates:

 

37/37 Your perfect match means you share a common male ancestor with a person who shares your surname

(or variant). Your relatedness is extremely close with the common ancestor predicted, 50% of the time,

in 5 generations or less and with a 90% probability within 16 generations. Very few people achieve this

close level of a match. All confidence levels are well within the time frame that surnames were adopted

in Western Europe

 

Doing the 67 Marker test, and matching 67/67 can close in a big gap:

 

67/67 Your perfect match means you share a common male ancestor with a person who shares your surname

(or variant). Your relatedness is extremely close with the common ancestor predicted, 50% of the time,

in 3 generations or less and with a 90% probability within 5 generations. Very few people achieve this

close level of a match. All confidence levels are well within the time frame that surnames were adopted

in Western Europe

 

 

There is a General fund which is a feature that Family Tree DNA offers. It allows members to donate money for other

potential member's test. The money is used at the Group Administrator's discretion. If interested, contact one of

the administrators for further information, or call FTDNA at (713) 868-1438

 

Test Results as a whole.

 

Test Results and Analysis

 

At this time our project is supporting 6 Haplogroups. J2, E1b1b1, R1b1b2, I1,I2a and 12b1. Haplogroups are one tool

used in splitting up groups. Having a different Haplogroups from another means that you are unrelated. To view these

different Groups and lineages click on the Haplogroup your interested in:

 

J2..1 member

 

The J2 lineage originated in the northern portion of the Fertile Crescent where it later spread throughout

central Asia, the Mediterranean, and south into India. As with other populations with Mediterranean ancestry

this lineage is found within Jewish populations.
Research note: Many people new to Genetic Genealogy think the J2 haplogroup is synonymous with having male

Jewish ancestry. One should note that having a J2 haplogroup assignment does not necessarily indicate Jewish

ancestry. The J2 haplogroup is far more ancient than the Jewish religion and is found in many lines with

Mediterranean region ancient ancestry. Another relatively more recent mode for J2's entry into some parts of

Europe from the Mediterranean areas could have been the Roman Legions and Roman settlements.
(http://www.kerchner.com/haplogroups-ydna.htm)

 

 

E1b1b1..8 members

 

According to the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG) and National Geographic's Genographic Project,

E1b1b1 may have arisen instead in the Near East or the Middle East and then expanded into the Mediterranean with the

spread of agriculture.All major sub-branches of E1b1b1 are thought to have originated in the same general area

as the parent clade: in North Africa, the Horn of Africa, or the Near East. Underhill (2002) believes that the structure

and regional pattern of E-M35 sub-clades potentially give "reagents with which to infer specific episodes of population

histories associated with the Neolithic agricultural expansion".

 

 

R1b1b2.. 40 members

 

The I Group...3 members

 

I1..1 member

 

The group displays a very clear frequency gradient, with a peak of approximately 40 percent among the populations of

western Finland and more than 50 percent in the province of Satakunta,around 35 percent in southern Norway,

southwestern Sweden especially on the island of Gotland, and Denmark, with rapidly decreasing frequencies toward the

edges of the historically Germanic sphere of influence. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I1a)

 

I2a..1 member

 

Haplogroup I2a appears to have originated in the Balkans, perhaps from a glacial refugium there; I2a is very common in

Croatia and Bosnia today and decreases in frequency across Eastern Europe. A rare offshoot branch of I2a is also found

further West, including in the British Isles. Another subgroup of I2a is by far the most common lineage in Sardinia, but

it is also found at low frequencies in France and Spain (http://www.ethnoancestry.com/I1b1.html)

 

I21b..1 member

 

The distributions of Haplogroup I1 and Haplogroup I2b1 seem to correlate fairly well with the extent of historical influence

of Germanic peoples. Haplogroup I2b1 has been found in over 4% of the population only in Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium,

Denmark, England (not including Wales or Cornwall), Scotland, and the southern tips of Sweden and Norway in Northwest Europe;

the provinces of Normandy, Maine, Anjou, and Perche in northwestern France; the province of Provence in southeastern France;

the regions of Tuscany, Umbria, and Latium in Italy; and Moldavia and the area around Russia's Ryazan Oblast and Republic of

Mordovia in Eastern Europe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I1b)